Global Mentors – Mentores Globales

I was quite lucky. Not two, but three mentors I met along my training years.

  1. Jesús Alvarez Fernández-Represa
  2. Julio García-Aguilar
  3. Jeffrey B. Matthews

Being in the right place at the right time was the secret of my success. However, many others are not so lucky.

That is the reason why I have created a list on Twitter, which is directly related with the #SoMe4Surgery community: Global Mentors https://twitter.com/juliomayol/lists/global-mentors-surgery

Senior surgeons on Twitter who express their interest in becoming #GlobalMentors will be included in the list.

Surgical trainees just need to subscribe and connect with the #SoMe4Surgery mentors in the list.

No matter where in the world they are, trainees will find the right mentor to support their professional development. Mentors will find the right mentee.

With Jeffrey B. Matthews, J
ulio Garcia-Aguilar and Richard Hodin: the Boston’s Beth Israel Hospital/Hospital Clinico San Carlos Mentoring team

Value based surgery – the Journal of the ASGBI

Today, the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland has published its Summer 2019 issue, including several contributions around a common topic: Value Based Surgery.

It has been an honour and a privilege to coordinate an outstanding group of surgeons, who have written thoughtful contributions regarding #Telemedicine, #PrecisionSurgery, #DigitalSurgery, #ERAS, and #Outcomes. The list of authors is as follows:

Muir Gray

Luis Sánchez-Guillen

Arfon Powell

Gemma Humm and Manish Chand

Mónica Millán

Rebecca Fish

I invite you to read their work here https://www.asgbi.org.uk/userfiles/file/journals/summer-2019-jasgbi.pdf

In order to transform the current practice of surgery into #ValuebasedSurgery, surgical leaders must address the following 5 common problems:

  1. Variability in quality and outcomes
  2. Harm
  3. Waste
  4. Inequities and Inequalities
  5. Lack of prevention

Coauthoring an article on #Valuebasedmedicine with Sir Muir Gray was particularly challenging, and funny. Quite an honour, and an unforgettable experience.

#SoMe4Trauma by Dr. Ameera AlHasan

Trauma takes numerous lives every year, in both a civilian and military setting. Trauma is the bread and butter of the general surgeon and the humble beginning of every specialized surgeon thereafter. It is therefore imperative to foster a strong online community that brings together efforts to raise awareness, share ideas and ultimately improve trauma practice on a global scale. This is how SoMe4Trauma was born.


Raised under the umbrella of the bigger SoMe4Surgery initiative, SoMe4Trauma aims to breed a community of trauma and acute care surgeons, other medical and non-medical trauma care providers (including ER doctors, nurses, EMS, fire brigade etc.), trauma policy advocates and trauma victims. Some of our goals include connecting the trauma community, sharing tacit & explicit knowledge, advancing trauma education, and creating a friendly and entertaining learning environment. In such a brief time period, the SoMe4Trauma family has managed to grow exponentially and to generate impact on Twitter. Such success can be attributed to a number of factors including the relevance of trauma to the medical community and the public (and the high burden of disease it represents), the unconditional support of influential surgeons on Twitter some of whom are true pioneers of trauma surgery and the continuous interaction of the SoMe4Trauma and SoMe4Surgery members.


Contrary to what it may seem, SoMe4Trauma is not a random tweeting service. The “behind the scenes” work that goes on in preparing most tweets is tremendous. That includes scheduling, networking, emailing guests back and forth, designing posters and recruiting tweeters to help interact and support the conversations. A structured approach is essential as real life efforts get translated into mere tweets. It is our belief that “failing to plan is planning to fail”. Real value can only be generated with vision and vigilance. 
             

Finally, just as management in the trauma bay depends on team work so does the sustenance of an online community like SoMe4Trauma. We invite you not only to interact with us, but to contribute and become a trauma leader yourself. All you have to do is to follow and use the hashtags #SoMe4Trauma and #SoMe4Surgery as SoMe4Trauma continues to blow your mind…hopefully, without causing any injuries 😉

What I’ve learnt today at #SSAT19

On the first day of the #SSAT19 meeting, two of the most important take-home messages came from a a retired surgeon, Prof. Christopher Ellison:

  1. You’re only old once,
  2. You never retire too early.

Robin McLeod has reminded us that the role of women in surgery is… the same as it is for a man.

Alberto Ferreres has pointed out that surgery is a moral practice, guided by three values: self-sacrifice, altruism and unselfishness.

Sachiyo Nomura has showed us how it is possible to manage a perfect balance between workload and well being in Japan.

Finally, Bruno Silverstein has reflected on the moral injuries that surgery inflicts on surgeons and, subsequently, lead to burntout.